Environmental Stewardship

Environmental Stewardship at Second Presbyterian Church encourages all members to join together in our collective responsibility for God’s creation.

Second Presbyterian Presented 2020 Sustain the Rock Award

The creation care initiatives at our church have been recognized by the City of Little Rock, as we are a winner in the Non-Profit Category for the annual Sustain the Rock Award for 2020! Announced the week of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day in April, we became the first church to win the award, and the second faith-based organization: Ferncliff Camp and Conference Center won this award in 2014!

The Sustain the Rock Awards recognize businesses, non-profits, individuals and City of Little Rock departments/employees who have made significant contributions to a greener Little Rock. Winners of these awards are recognized for contributing to a “more sustainable city, by embracing and promoting an approach to business and daily living that balances environmental responsibility, economic prosperity, and social equity.”

In 2019, the church installed a new solar panel array. The installation is a carport structure containing 81 permanently fixed solar panels and two EV charging stations for electric cars. The solar array is located on the grass median in the south parking lot. The solar panels will provide energy to the church from a renewable source and are projected to have an annual production of 39,360kWh (AC). The contractor was Seal Solar of North Little Rock.

As an Earth Care Congregation, Second Presbyterian Church takes our call as prophetic witnesses and stewards seriously. Solar panels located on our campus can reduce our dependence on non-renewable resources, off set energy costs and publicly proclaim the value of Christian conservation of natural resources.

From “Let Heaven and Nature Sing”, Rev. Steve Hancock’s December 2014 sermon:

“When Christ comes to the world, it is not just for us humans. It is for all creation. God made nature beautiful, and we have done nature harm. The news of Christ’s coming to earth is news that God means to heal all nature too.

You know the words from the carol, “Let heaven and nature sing. Let earth receive her king. Fields and flood. Rocks, hills and plains, repeat the sounding joy.”

It’s not angels singing here; it’s the rocks. It’s the oceans exultant. The book of Genesis knows that our species brings a curse upon nature. The first couple commissioned by God to care for the earth takes from a tree what they shouldn’t, resulting, says the story, among other things, in the springing up of thorns. Which is to say, our sins have painful implications for the earth.

So the carol sings, “No more let sins and sorrows grow, nor thorns infest the growth. He comes to make his blessing flow, far as the curse is found.”

Do you really think that we humans are all that he came to earth to love and to save? Do you think we can love and serve Christ and not love nature, and serve the good of the earth, which is called to sing with us the great joy?” Read more: Let Heaven and Nature Sing

From “Caring for Creation”, Rev. Steve Hancock’s June 2009 sermon:

“So we who believe in God have the deepest of all reasons to do the things we know to do to enjoy the earth and take care of it. Are you doing the things you know are right to do as part of your obedience to God? Are you consuming less? Burning less fuel? Recycling? Caring about better environmental laws? Making humble choices in what you buy and use? Are you trying to simplify your life so that your part in God’s whole creation is less abusive and more fruitful? Are you thankful for the wonders of creation that are yours to see and touch and enjoy? And are you giving more and more of it back to God?” Read more: Caring for Creation

Steve Hancock’s sermon, May 15, 2011:  Partnering in Praise

Going Green for Creation: Letter to Congregation

Three Green Lists

Calculate Your Carbon Footprint

Resources which contain a variety of information on Going Green